It’s beyond physical

Clockwise: Milo Sports Interactive Online Classes poster; Meagan’s earlier fencing competitions; Meagan and Marcus’ training with Penn State University Fencing Coach Wes Glon; Meagan excitedly wearing her National Junior Team Fencing track suit; and Mommy Kaye Figuracion with daughter Keisha in Milo Online Gymnastics class

I GREW up hearing that sports could be distracting to academics. I guess this is also where the stereotype comes about star athletes struggling in academics, while kids who excel academically can’t be star athletes. When I started to read more books on child development when my kids were babies, it was enlightening to know that physical activities actually enhance a child’s mental development and well-being. In fact, motor development should first be developed for better brain development.

As seen on www.earlyresources.co.uk, the six positive effects that physical activity has on a child’s mental development and well-being are:

  • It boosts brainpower and cognitive ability because of the greater flow of blood to the brain assists in the creation of new brain cells;
  • It enhances academic learning because physical activity increases levels of a brain-derived protein, which improves focus, concentration and decision-making;
  • It elevates mood and reduces anxiety due to the release of “feel good” hormones, called endorphins;
  • It improves social skills;
  • It enhances creativity because physical activity helps spark creative juices and overcome mental blocks; and
  • It helps maintain mental health and emotional well-being.

As part of my quest to find “Simplify Parenting” solutions, I saw physical activities like infant swimming, visiting the playground, riding their scooters and bikes and even simple tumbling and jumping around, as that “one” effort that would bring forth multiple and long-term benefits for my kids. I introduced them to sports for this purpose. It was never about raising athletes. It is great that my daughter recently got into the National Junior Fencing Team, but I am happier that she is developing holistically, prouder of her for the intrinsic and full effort she chose to put in to get there.

Now that my eldest Meagan is 14 and my son Marcus is 10, I can attest that developing physical skills like sports brings results beyond motor abilities. I believe this has helped both of them to excel in academics, school activities and their chosen interests. I believe it has also taught them resilience, hard work and confidence in handling both people and situations. That is why I am very happy that MILO Home Court is bringing on-ground sports online and in homes, so that kids can still partake in different activities during this pandemic.

The platform recently launched the MILO Sports Interactive Online Classes, where kids are given the opportunity to interact and get more personal direction from professional coaches and esteemed athletes from the health drinks’s long-standing partner sports organizations. Through MSIOC, parents can enroll their kids in real-time sessions via videoconferencing tools like Zoom or Google Meet. This setup also gives the kids a chance to interact and gain new friends from the session because the sessions are done in groups.

Rates vary per sport and enrolling in the classes are specific to children’s ages 4 to 12 and their level of competency to ensure that they’ll get to properly follow and keep up. More information about the organizers and the classes on offer can be found at bit.ly/3dhCD2g.

MSIOC also gives kids a sense of acceptance and belonging from doing activities and spending time with other kids who enjoy their interests.

“We loved how Coach Eva was very warm and welcoming to us,” says mommy blogger Kaye Figuracion, who signed up her daughter Keisha in the gymnastics class. “We felt comfortable to join the others even if we were newbies. Everyone was also patient with Keisha, especially when she was struggling to follow the moves. The tips and instructions they gave helped her a lot. We also had fun meeting other moms and kids online.”

Total
3
Shares
Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published.

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.

Previous Article

Vaccinating children: Is Covid-19 herd immunity possible without them?

Next Article

Rural governor talks of canceling local torch relay